Last edited by Nacage
Wednesday, July 29, 2020 | History

2 edition of Discharge of submerged sluice gates. found in the catalog.

Discharge of submerged sluice gates.

Rowland Cuthbert Robin

Discharge of submerged sluice gates.

by Rowland Cuthbert Robin

  • 303 Want to read
  • 14 Currently reading

Published in [n.p .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Sluice gates

  • The Physical Object
    Pagination[12] p. diag., table.
    Number of Pages12
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16371281M

    discharge equations, and determining the value of a coefficient, which defines the transition between orifice and non-orifice flow conditions. The second objective was to determine whether a single equation could be used to represent the stage-discharge relationship for both free and submerged non-orifice flow through a rectangular sluice gate. gate~opening may be either partly or entirely submerged. For the unsubmerged part of the gate opening the discharge shall be calculated according to However, for the submerged part of the gate open- ing discharge shall be calculated by the following relation: Q= C.A. 1/ 2gH.

    Discharge characteristics for a skew sluice gate, ranging between the two extreme cases of a side sluice gate and a normal sluice gate, have been explored. The concept of an elementary discharge coefficient was utilized for obtaining the discharge through a skew sluice gate. Based on experimental investigation, equations for elementary discharge coefficients for skew sluice gates in free- and. 5. Discharge Through a Submerged Rectangular Orifice. The equation for computing the discharge of the standard submerged rectangular orifice is: (b) where: Q = discharge (ft 3 /s) C c = coefficient of contraction C vf = coefficient of velocity caused by friction loss C va = coefficient to account for exclusion of approach velocity head from.

    WATERMAN HEAVY-DUTY CAST IRON SLIDE (SLUICE) GATES are used in applications where safety and reliable performance are essential (dams, tidal environments, water treatment plants) and where outstanding product longevity is desired.. Waterman cast gates are preferred for high-head (up to ′) and high debris (water treatment) environments as well as for critical gateways in treatment plants. Equation can be used for sluice gates when they are in effect bottom and/or side suppressed rectangular orifices with variable opening area. Table A gives discharge versus head for orifices that are both bottom and side suppressed for orifice areas of 2 ft 2 to ft 2. Other more exact and complex approaches can be used for determining.


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Discharge of submerged sluice gates by Rowland Cuthbert Robin Download PDF EPUB FB2

Real accuracy of several calibration methods for sluice gates working in the submerged orifice flow condition was determined considering water discharge from water levels and gate openings. Data were taken from three gates of the same laboratory canal covering a large operational by:   The discharge coefficient (C d) of sluice gates under submerged flow condition is computed based on a study of sluice gate discharge calculation performed in Rajaratnam and Subramanya, and they expressed the discharge through a sluice gate as: (4) C d = Q Gb t 2 gH where H = the upstream water depth to the tail water depth (H = H U − Y 3), Q Cited by: 5.

Highlights The flow through submerged and free sluice gate is considered. Buckingham theorem and Incomplete Self-Similarity concepts were used to develop a new head–discharge relationship. New parameters are identified as missing factors in the functional dimensional equation.

The proposed formula can be used to calibrate the sluice gate flow continuously from free to submerged flow by: Sluice‐gate discharge coefficient is an involved function of geometric and hydraulic parameters. For free flow, it is related to upstream depth and gate opening, whereas for submerged flow, in addition to these parameters, it depends on tail‐water by: Four rectangular sluice gates were calibrated for submerged-flow conditions using nea field-measured data points on Canal B of the B-XII irrigation scheme in Lebrija, Spain.

A theoretical method was used to derive an equation for the discharge coefficient of sluice gates in rectangular channels under orifice-flow (both free and submerged) conditions. The proposed equation allows for the effects of energy dissipation between the upstream section of the gate and the vena contracta.

Similar to an ordinary sluice gate, the discharge below gates located over sills in rectangular channels may be expressed as: (1) q = C d G 2 g (H − Z) where q is the discharge per unit width, H is the upstream flow depth above the channel bed, G is the gate opening, Z is the sill height above the bed, g is the gravitational acceleration and.

In this paper the submerged flow through radial gates with and without a gate sill was experimentally investigated. The effect of different gate sill heights on contraction coefficient, discharge. Vertical sluice gates are widely used for flow control in irrigation and drainage channels.

When the opening is smaller than the critical depth, the flow immediately downstream of the gate will be supercritical.

Flows through the gate may be free or submerged depending on the tailwater depth. This study analyzes the possibilities of using an irrigation sluice gate in submerged conditions to measure water flow rate. Hydraulic experiments on sluice gate discharge capacity were performed on a model made on a scale.

Measurements were taken for the submerged flow of the sluice gate. Nomograms and relationships for discharge coefficients of the analyzed sluice gate were developed.

In this paper the effect of vortex formation upstream inclined sluice gate, discharge coefficient as well as predicted discharge equation have been studied for several gate openings (3,4&) cm. Henry studied the diffusion of submerged jet downstream of a normal sluice gate and developed a useful diagram for discharge coefficient (C d) in free and submerged flow conditions.

Based on the experimental curves demonstrated in [1], Swamee [3] proposed equations for both free and submerged flows as well as criterion for submergence.

Radial gates with sills are studies by US Army Engineers Waterway station () and later on by Abdelsalam et al. Vertical gates with sill under free and submerged flow conditions were. The discharge coefficient of sluice gates in free and submerged conditions plays an important role in determining the flow rate past such structures.

The effects of relative gate opening and submergence ratio have been widely considered by several investigators, mainly based on experimental work.

The program is capable of modeling both radial gates (often called tainter gates), vertical lift gates (sluice gates), and overflow gates. The equations used to model the gate openings can handle both submerged and unsubmerged conditions at the inlet and the outlet of the gates.

gate profile is shown in Figure 1 for a radial gate. Figure 1. Definition sketch for radial gate. Clemmens et al. () developed a procedure for determining submerged radial gate discharge based on the energy equation applied between sections 1 and 2 and the momentum equation applied between sections 2 and 3, the Energy-Momentum or E-M method.

Sluice gate flow metering is often used to measure flow rate in open channels. Sluice gates are also often used to modulate flow. The sluice gate flow rate measurement is based on the Bernoulli Equation and can be expressed as.

1/2 ρ v 1 2 + ρ g h 1 = 1/2 ρ v 2 2 + ρ g h 2 (1). where. h = elevation height (m). ρ = density (kg/m 3). v = flow velocity (m/s). Four rectangular sluice gates were calibrated for submerged-flow conditions using nea field-measured data points on Canal B of the B-XII irrigation scheme in Lebrija, Spain.

Water depth and gate opening values were measured using acoustic sensors at each of the gate structures, and the data were recorded on electronic data loggers.

Therefore, the choice of a gate discharge coefficient must be supported by a site-specific calibration that, ideally, should he accompanied by an assessment of accurac y. Thus, the goal of this paper was the evaluation of calibration procedures for submerged sluice gates operating in.

Discharge Equation For Inclined Sluice Gate Abstract Generally, sluice gates are used to regulate flow in open channels. The discharge coefficient of a sluice gate is a function of geometric and hydraulic properties.

For free flow conditions; the discharge coefficient is related to upstream flow depth and gate opening, whereas for submerged. Consequently, can be defined as a function of relative gate opening and discharge coefficient at the free flow condition.

Thus is known if the discharge coefficient and relative gate opening are known. 3. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION a) Contraction coefficient of sluice gates at free and submerged .Real accuracy of several calibration methods for sluice gates working in the submerged orifice flow condition was determined considering water discharge from water levels and gate openings.

Data were taken from three gates of the same laboratory canal covering a large operational range. Using accurate hydraulic data, most of the methods produce errors of up to ±10%.The test program shows that the evaluation of the discharge under sluice gates for free and submerged flows and for the transition between both flows .